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Prostate Cancer | Old&New SNPs and deCODEPrCa February 15, 2008

Posted by ramunas in cancer genetics, familial cancer, genetic testing, hereditary cancer, prostate cancer, research, sporadic cancer.
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This week was undoubtfully very important in elucidation of genetic predisposition to prostate cancer. Three teams (two public and one private) reported their SNP studies in Nature Genetics.

A two-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS), lead by well known Cancer Research UK researchers dr. Rosalind Eeles and Douglas F Easton, was performed on Australian and UK men and confirmed previously associated genetic variants (SNP’s) to prostate cancer at 8q24, occurring in three distinct blocs, which were best “tagged” by SNPs rs6983267, rs1016343 and rs4242384 (as you know, our genome is fragmented and genetic information passes through generations by distinct “blocks” of DNA, called haplotypes, and which can be “marked/tagged” by representative spots, called “tag SNP” – a kind of genetic folksonomy marks) and 17q (a strongest association with rs7501939 (at 17q12) and rs1859962 (at 17q24) . Also several genetic variants on seven new loci on chromosomes 3 (rs2660753), 6 (rs9364554), 7 (rs6465657), 10 (rs10993994), 11 (rs7931342), 19 (rs2735839) and X (rs5945619) were identified, which could explain ~6% of the genetic risk for prostate cancer (a highly significant SNP rs10993994 in MSMB (beta-microseminoprotein) gene proximal promoter constitutes ~2% of risk).

Constantly innovative deCODE based on own results issued predisposition to prostate cancer test deCODE PrCa of 8 SNPs for $500, which is the second commercially available genetic test for prostate cancer after Focus5 test offered by Proactive Genomics. Two new SNP’s single-letter variations (rs721048 on chromosome 2 and rs5945572 on the X chromosome are also included in deCODEme genotyping service, and subscribers can check it out now.

These two SNPs confer relatively modest increases in risk – of approximately 20% and 15% per copy carried, respectively – but because they are also quite common they are each believed to contribute to about 5% of prostate cancer cases (via).

“The genetic testing market is highly competitive. No sooner does one company launch a first-of-its-kind test than another launches a similar one”, Hsien at EyeOnDNA notes about this new test.

Other study also confirms previously reported loci on 8q24 and 17q chromosomes and identifies new SNPs on 7 (rs10486567), 10 (rs10993994; strongest association) and 11 (rs10896449) chromosomes (overal 7 SNPs). Individual population attributable risk (PAR) for prostate cancer for each of the seven independent loci ranged from 8% to 20%.

These findings help clarify genetic structure of prostate cancer, shed light on plausible candidates gene regions and have implications for risk counseling, which can be of clinical importance when cumulative risk is appreciated.

Interestingly, all studies were performed using Illumina bead-chips platform.

Note: to associate any SNP with some condition a strict statistics must be applied: the results must meet or at least approach the “standart of genome-wide significance” with P value <10 minus 7 (0.00000001).

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Comments»

1. steve - June 17, 2010

Any new test for cancer is a welcome milestone – particularly less invasive ones than those used at present. Of course accuracy of results is important, but the easier the tests are to use, the more people there will be who benefit from them.


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